Simple Experiments Show How Motion Is Equivalent to Heat

Simple Experiments Show How Motion Is Equivalent to Heat

Some of the most difficult (and most important) experiments in the history of physics had to do with making connections between different concepts. What about the connection between objects moving around (kinematics) and objects changing temperature (thermodynamics)? That was a tough one. It’s called the mechanical equivalent of heat and it was explored in 1868 by James Joule. The basic idea was to have a mass that moves down due to the gravitational force. This mass is attached to a

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The Arctic’s ‘Carbon Bomb’ Could Screw the Climate Even More

The Arctic's ‘Carbon Bomb’ Could Screw the Climate Even More

This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Even in a dream-come-true scenario where we manage to stop all the world’s carbon emissions overnight, the Arctic would inevitably get hotter and hotter. That’s according to a new report by UN Environment, which says the the region is already “locked in” to wintertime warming of 4 to 5 degrees C (7.2 to 9 degrees F) over temperatures of the late 1900s.

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Watch Virgin Galactic pilots blast into space, view Earth from above

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The spaceship Unity left Earth Friday morning and then successfully glided back down to California’s Mojave desert. Virgin Galactic pilots Dave Mackay and Mike Masucci flew the aerospace company’s fifth-supersonic powered test flight — with a working passenger aboard, . After taking off from a runway attached to the WhiteKnightTwo “mothership,” Unity then detached at some 45,000 feet before its rocket motor ignited and the craft blasted into space.  There, at , the crew viewed the black realms of space

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When It Comes to Super Bowl Kickers, Who Will Choke First?

When It Comes to Super Bowl Kickers, Who Will Choke First?

Whether you’re rooting for the New England Patriots this weekend or the Los Angeles Rams, some of the tensest moments of Super Bowl LIII will likely come when a kicker stares down the field, breaks into a sprint, and plants his foot on the ball, sending it arcing towards the field goal in hopes of scoring a few precious points. Those slowed-down moments of the game, in the high-stakes environment of football’s championship event, are when a little sports psychology

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The Very Vortex-y Science of Making Snow From Boiling Water

The Very Vortex-y Science of Making Snow From Boiling Water

I guess it’s a mixture of boredom from staying home in the super-cold weather and access to the internet that causes this problem. What problem, you ask? The countless videos of people throwing boiling water out into the Arctic cold air during the polar vortex. OK, I’ll admit—it also looks really cool. Here’s what it looks like. But what the heck is really happening here? Why does it make this awesome cloud-looking thing? Why does it have to be super

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This App Lets Kenya’s Farmers Access Satellite Data to Monitor Crops

This App Lets Kenya’s Farmers Access Satellite Data to Monitor Crops

Climate change is the most horrific threat our species has ever known: No matter how powerful you are or how much money you have, our transforming planet is a reckoning for every one of us. But there are degrees to this misery. If you’re perched in a Manhattan penthouse, the effects might not be immediately apparent (because you don’t care or aren’t paying attention, or both). If you’re a subsistence farmer in Kenya, the situation is already much more dire.

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Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Humans and antibiotics have had a good run. These “miracle” molecules have saved millions of lives and and alleviated incalculable suffering around the globe. But in the last few decades, as millions of tons of antibiotics were indiscriminately pumped into humans (and farm animals), the pace of bacterial evolution began to outstrip pharmaceutical innovation. Today, nearly every disease-causing bacteria has acquired defenses against these drugs. As the world’s armory of effective medicines draws down, humans are running out of time

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CERN’s plan for 100-km collider makes the LHC look like a hula hoop – TechCrunch

CERN’s plan for 100-km collider makes the LHC look like a hula hoop – TechCrunch

The Large Hadron Collider has produced a great deal of incredible science, most famously the Higgs Boson — but physicists at CERN, the international organization behind the LHC, are already looking forward to the next model. And the proposed Future Circular Collider, at 100 kilometers or 62 miles around, would be quite an upgrade. The idea isn’t new; CERN has had people looking into it for years. But the conceptual design report issued today shows that all that consulting hasn’t

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So You Want to Harness Evaporation From a Manmade Lake

So You Want to Harness Evaporation From a Manmade Lake

Sometimes you come across crazy stuff on the internet. Just check out the Qattara Depression Project; the basic idea is to create a channel to let water from the Mediterranean Sea flow into the Qattara Depression, a giant low-lying area in Egypt. This would create an enormous artificial lake that would change the local climate. It’s a prime example of a massive geoengineering project. The project never got underway, probably because it would be too expensive. But I don’t want

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Uranus is weird and researchers think a giant collision caused it

Farewell shot of crescent Uranus as Voyager 2 departs, as depicted by Voyager 2 spacecraft.

Farewell shot of crescent Uranus as Voyager 2 departs, as depicted by Voyager 2 spacecraft.Image: TIME LIFE PICTURES/NASA/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES By Kellen Beck2018-12-22 15:35:36 UTC Uranus has always been a bit of an oddball in our solar system and a new simulation presented by a group of researchers might explain why. Uranus, the seventh planet from the sun, is a peculiar ice giant that is tilted at a 98-degree angle — while every other planet spins on a

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